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Archive for the ‘Telemedicine’ Category

Focus on Referral Issues

November 14, 2007 Leave a comment

This article in the recent issue of Trends Magazine, highlights many of the issues that prompted me to found Veterinary Answers. AAHA held forums to promote better relationships between general practitioners and specialists. The forums were held in Denver, CO; Orange County & Fremont, CA; Houston, TX; Chicago, IL; Boston, MA; and Washington, DC and were attended by 121 specialists & 74 general practitioners. Unfortunately, specialists were overrepresented. But I think the results are pertinent.

Please add your perspective on these issues, too.

The Referring Veterinarian’s Perspective

  • They would like “mutual respect and a non-judgmental attitude” in communications with specialists.
  • They prefer that their calls be returned during business hours.
  • They would like to have a specialist give due to consideration to consultations and advice on cases that cannot be referred.

The Specialist’s Perspective

  • Because of busy schedules, they return most calls after hours.
  • Most specialists return consult calls last.
  • Specialists are hesitant to discuss advice when a case is not going to be referred.
  • They are also hesitant to give advice on cases they have not seen for a long time.

I have been on both sides here. It is so frustrating to have a difficult case that cannot be referred, yet you and owner desperately want to help the animal. I have also been the busy specialist who didn’t see her less urgent messages until she could finally sit down at her desk at 8:30 in the evening, long after most veterinarians (hopefully) have gone home. I can’t tell you how many consults I gave on the fly to a vet who needed help. I gave the best advice I could while juggling several issues at once (an occasionally with an ultrasound probe in my hand). It wasn’t fair to anyone. My advice wasn’t as well reasoned as it should have been, I probably sounded stressed, and the veterinarian at the other end of the phone did not receive any documentation of our conversation. While doing referral work, most of my time was spent talking with owners and RDVMs about hospitalized cases, doing ultrasound, and SOAPing patients. Everything else developed a low priority so that my patients could receive the best care. Something had to give, and unfortunately, it was often the referring veterinarians who paid the price.

Veterinary Answers gives calling veterinarians their undivided attention. Every call is followed with a written report that is faxed or emailed to the veterinarian to document the conversation. We work together with veterinarians to advance the level of care they give all of their patients. We understand the limitations veterinarians face, from owner financial constraints to limited resources. Together, we will work with you to help your patients despite these obstacles.

Focus on Referral Issues

November 14, 2007 Leave a comment

This article in the recent issue of Trends Magazine, highlights many of the issues that prompted me to found Veterinary Answers. AAHA held forums to promote better relationships between general practitioners and specialists. The forums were held in Denver, CO; Orange County & Fremont, CA; Houston, TX; Chicago, IL; Boston, MA; and Washington, DC and were attended by 121 specialists & 74 general practitioners. Unfortunately, specialists were overrepresented. But I think the results are pertinent.

Please add your perspective on these issues, too.

The Referring Veterinarian’s Perspective

  • They would like “mutual respect and a non-judgmental attitude” in communications with specialists.
  • They prefer that their calls be returned during business hours.
  • They would like to have a specialist give due to consideration to consultations and advice on cases that cannot be referred.

The Specialist’s Perspective

  • Because of busy schedules, they return most calls after hours.
  • Most specialists return consult calls last.
  • Specialists are hesitant to discuss advice when a case is not going to be referred.
  • They are also hesitant to give advice on cases they have not seen for a long time.

I have been on both sides here. It is so frustrating to have a difficult case that cannot be referred, yet you and owner desperately want to help the animal. I have also been the busy specialist who didn’t see her less urgent messages until she could finally sit down at her desk at 8:30 in the evening, long after most veterinarians (hopefully) have gone home. I can’t tell you how many consults I gave on the fly to a vet who needed help. I gave the best advice I could while juggling several issues at once (an occasionally with an ultrasound probe in my hand). It wasn’t fair to anyone. My advice wasn’t as well reasoned as it should have been, I probably sounded stressed, and the veterinarian at the other end of the phone did not receive any documentation of our conversation. While doing referral work, most of my time was spent talking with owners and RDVMs about hospitalized cases, doing ultrasound, and SOAPing patients. Everything else developed a low priority so that my patients could receive the best care. Something had to give, and unfortunately, it was often the referring veterinarians who paid the price.

Veterinary Answers gives calling veterinarians their undivided attention. Every call is followed with a written report that is faxed or emailed to the veterinarian to document the conversation. We work together with veterinarians to advance the level of care they give all of their patients. We understand the limitations veterinarians face, from owner financial constraints to limited resources. Together, we will work with you to help your patients despite these obstacles.

The Future of Veterinary Answers

November 1, 2007 Leave a comment

 

What’s In Store For Veterinary Answers?

  • More Consultants! Tell us which specialties you would like us to add
  • Continuing education seminars – We can provide a speaker for your next event or staff meeting.
  • Research – As veterinarians on the front line, you are the first to see cases of emerging diseases, trends in antibiotic resistance, clusters of immune-mediated or neoplastic diseases. We can work together to address trends more quickly.

Tell us what else you would like to see.

Veterinary Answers Partners with Diagnostic Vet Labs

November 1, 2007 Leave a comment

In the Los Angeles metropolitan area, Veterinary Answers has partnered with Diagnostic Vet Labs to offer internal medicine consultations through the lab on their lab work.

We also offer a 20% discount on our services directly to DVL clients.

Contact DVL at (800) 247-8621 to set up a DVL account.

Veterinary Answers Services

November 1, 2007 3 comments

Advice on diagnosis and management of difficult cases
Veterinary Answers understands the difficulties you face in your practice – from an animal owner’s financial limitations, to staff and equipment availability, and the reality that you will never have enough time in the day to do everything. Our goal is to work with you to find the next step in diagnosis or treatment of your patients under these circumstances.

Answers to general questions
– Call us when you have a question related to a patient, recent veterinary news, new products, etc. We will research the answer and provide written follow up.

Article Search – Once you leave academia, it is difficult to find the latest information from every journal. We have access to a large number of veterinary and scientific journals. If you are looking for a particular article or the most recent information on a given topic, we can find it for you.

Set Up Protocols
Your clients appreciate it when all doctors in a practice work in similar ways to treat their pets. Catch chronic diseases early, prevent transmission of infectious diseases inside and outside of your clinic, give your patients the best quality of life by managing their chronic diseases based on the latest research. Veterinary Answers will work with you to develop protocols that fit your practice.

    • Vaccination
      • Which core vaccines should your clinic use?
      • How often should you vaccinate?
      • What are the alternative options?
    • Infection Control
      • Isolation Protocols
      • Protocols for Feline Upper Respiratory Infection Management
      • Protocols for Parvovirus Management
      • Protocols for Antibiotic Resistant Infection Management & Prevention
    • Infectious Disease Testing
      • FeLV/FIV
      • Lyme/E. canis/A. phagocytophilum/Heartworm
      • Parvovirus
      • Intestinal parasites

Internal Medicine

      • Geriatric screening
      • Chronic Vomiting/Diarrhea
      • Chronic Diabetes mellitus
      • DKA & Hypoglycemic Crisis Management
      • Hyperadrenocorticism
      • Hypoadrenocorticism
      • Refractory hypothyroidism
      • Hyperthyroidism and Chronic Renal Failure
      • Chronic Renal Failure management in cats and dogs
      • Chronic Urinary Tract Infections
      • Urolithiasis
      • PU/PD Workup
      • Feline Idiopathic Cystitis
      • Hypertension
      • Immune-mediated diseases
      • Inflammatory bowel disease
      • Chronic Rhinitis
      • Hepatopathies

Oncology

      • Staging for Common Neoplastic Diseases
      • Cancer treatment protocols and response rates
      • Discussion of best treatment options
      • Palliative treatment options

Anesthesia

      • Pre-anesthetic screening protocols
      • Anesthesia protocols for all life stages and underlying disease conditions
      • Prepare a protocol for a high risk patient
      • Prepare a protocol for a patient with previous anesthetic complications

Emergency Medicine

      • Emergency Treatment & Diagnosis of the Dyspneic Patient
      • Hit By Car
      • Hemoabdomen
      • Stabilization of congestive heart failure
      • Acute Renal Failure
      • Diabetic ketoacidosis
      • Urethral obstruction
      • Paresis: evaluation and next steps
      • Talk through procedures: pericardiocentesis, thoracocentesis, chest tube, tracheostomy
      • Head Trauma: drugs, nursing care, ventilation
      • Dystocia
      • Cluster seizures, Status Epilepticus
      • Pain control
      • Snake bite and envenomation
      • Saddle thrombus management and important points of discussion with owners
      • Heat stroke
      • Common toxicities
      • Transfusion medicine


www. veterinaryanswers.com

Veterinary Answers Consultants

November 1, 2007 Leave a comment

Jennifer S. Fryer, DVM – Internal Medicine Consultant – Founder of Veterinary Answers.

AB with Honors in Development Studies – Brown University.

DVM – North Carolina State University.

Internship and Small Animal Internal Medicine Residency – Texas A&M University.

Credentials accepted by ACVIM.

Clinical interests include infectious and immune-mediated diseases, renal disease, feline medicine, data collection for clinical research.


Zachary Wright, DVM – Oncology Consultant

BA in History – University of Notre Dame

DVM – Texas A&M University

Small Animal Internship – VCA West LA Animal Hospital

Currently a 3rd year medical oncology resident at Texas A&M University.

Clinical interests include palliative pain control for osteosarcomas, novel diagnostics for transitional cell carcinoma, radiation therapy.


Courtney Baetge, DVM – Anesthesia Consultant

BA Cum Laude in Wildlife and Fisheries – Texas A&M University

Anesthesia Residency – Texas A&M University

ACVA Board Eligible

Clinical interests include anesthesia in canine airway disease and geriatric patients.

Megan Ridley, DVM – Emergency Medicine

BS high honors in biology – University of Michigan

DVM – Cornell

Internship in Small animal medicine and surgery – SouthPaws Veterinary Referral Center

Emergency clinician for last 5 years in New York and Viriginia

Clinical interests include treatment of the trauma patient, critical care, renal disease, geriatric medicine.

Nicholas Millichamp, Bsc, PhD, DACVO – Ophthalmology

Joan Dzeizyc, DVM, DAVCO – Ophthalmology

Christopher Kunze, DVM, DAVCR – Radiology

www.veterinaryanswers.com

 

 

The Future of Veterinary Answers

November 1, 2007 Leave a comment
What’s In Store For Veterinary Answers?

  • More Consultants! Tell us which specialties you would like us to add
  • Continuing education seminars – We can provide a speaker for your next event or staff meeting.
  • Research – As veterinarians on the front line, you are the first to see cases of emerging diseases, trends in antibiotic resistance, clusters of immune-mediated or neoplastic diseases. We can work together to address trends more quickly.

Tell us what else you would like to see.